JPoint 2015: review of applications from speakers

    Hello!

    Last weekend, we ended up accepting applications from speakers at JPoint 2015. Among them, we got both interesting and not so much. Reception of applications is almost closed . Today we will accept the latest applications from you and close at midnight. If you want to speak at JPoint, immediately fill out an application and we will contact you within 24 hours.



    Under the cut you will find a short overview of the submitted reports and a traditional voting ballot.

    Roman Levents, Higher Frequency Trading - Comparison of in-memory key-value stores
    Status: in doubt
    In this report, Roman wants to compare Hazelcast, Ehcache, Infinispan, MapDB, Chronicle Map and one-nio. The comparison will be in terms of:
    • target features
    • architecture / algorithm / implementation
    • performance (time / memory) in different cases
    • limitations


    Jacob Sirotkin, Sidenis - Migrating from PL / SQL to Java
    Status: Admitted to the Program
    In the report, Jacob tells about the experience of rewriting about 20K lines of code for stored procedures from PL / SQL to Java, including a 1000-line procedure. It will be explained why it was necessary, how it was done and what it gave the business.

    Alexey Shipilev, Oracle - Catechism java.lang.String
    Status: accepted into the program
    In this report, we will look at the main defects of working with strings: gluttony of concatenation, fornication of substrings, greed for internment, pride of deduplication, etc. We will find out what the excessive hope for JDK and JVM is worth.

    Alexey Shipilev, Oracle - Compress me completely
    Status: accepted into the program
    In this report, we delve into the guts of the JVM and JDK, looking for how the platform is trying to save on memory. Let's look at packing headers and fields of objects, compressing pointers, accounting for intergenerational links in heaps, autoboxing cache, etc.

    Nikolai Garbuzov, Donriver - How we filled up cones and learned how to get around a rake
    Status: questionable The
    report is devoted to both general issues of developing a financial platform (200+ modules) and some specific issues. Questions will be considered:
    • developing new functionality, in parallel with supporting existing code
    • integration of internal services
    • integration with third-party services
    • development of an automatic testing system


    Arthur Pilipenko, Oracle - Closed Model in Java ME Embedded
    Status: in doubt
    When analyzing application code, the guys in Java ME Embedded automatically delete unused parts of the platform: methods, fields and classes of the standard library, parts of runtime and even parts of the virtual machine. The report will focus on the analysis of Java code dependencies, reflection, native methods and optimizations used in the closed model.

    Gleb Smirnov, Plumbr - Secrets are in our heads, not in the JVM
    Status: accepted into the program
    Using the open source code of HotSpot JVM, Gleb will sort out a few seemingly mysterious problems, plunging into the fascinating world of C-code with the audience.

    Alexander Podkhalyuzin, JetBrains - Development Productivity at Scala
    Status: accepted into the program
    From the report you will learn about what practices and tools can be used in training and further programming in Scala. Scala Worksheet and its application will be reviewed. An overview of some common errors in Scala code will be provided. In addition, possible refactoring of the Scala language, and tools for debug implicits will be considered. The report will be followed by a short introduction to the language.

    Nikita Salnikov-Tarnovsky - Where is my memory, man ?!
    Status: admitted to the program
    The report talks about various ways to monitor memory usage from a Java application and how to distinguish between normal and potentially critical situations. We will also talk about what information and when to collect in order to start solving problems related to memory usage by the application. In addition, the report briefly touches on leaks of class loaders and their features.

    Dmitry Chuyko, Oracle - CompletableFuture is already here
    Status: accepted into the program
    With the advent of CompletableFutire in Java 8, a simple exit from the hell of callbacks to the world of simple and functional Java code has opened. Blocking calls are no longer needed. In the report Completable Future "with streams and lambdas" will be tested in practice. In addition, the following topics will be covered:
    • Moving from Future-based locking execution to CompletableFuture-free locking approach
    • API parsing
    • Overhead
    • A simple guide for multi-tier systems (for example, a web server)


    Nikolay Alimenkov, XP Injection - Do we need JMS in the world of modern Java technologies?
    Status: accepted into the program
    There are many alternative solutions to organize effective message queues: AMQP, Redis, ZooKeeper, Apache Kafka or even self-written queues on Cassandra. Why not use them instead of JMS? This report will discuss the cornerstones of any distributed messaging-based system. As a result, JMS will be examined from precisely this angle.

    Alexey Ragozin, Deutsche Bank - Continuous profiling of Java applications during operation
    Status: accepted into the program
    Is it possible to profile an application under real load during real operation? The report will discuss the collection of telemetry applications and the subsequent analysis of this data.
    • Monitoring and telemetry are two different things, no need to mix
    • Telemetry selection
    • Telemetry data accumulation - problems and practical experience
    • Sampling stack images and analyzing them
    • Flight recorder - telemetry built into the JVM


    Mikhail Shiryaev, Effective Management Systems - Object-Oriented Base
    Status: in doubt
    Alternative EJB technology. Object oriented base. Building large structures graphs trees. Uniformity, simplification and acceleration of work with related melons. Increased software development speed.

    Volker Simonis, SAP - Packed Objects, Object Layout & Value Types - a Survey
    Status: accepted into the program
    Report on various projects to implement C-like structs in Java SE. Will be considered:
    • Packed Objects - an extension implemented in the IBM Java SDK 8
    • Object Layout - a layout-optimized data storage structure from Azul Systems
    • Value Types - OpenJDK proposal for small, immutable data.


    Alexey Zinoviev, Tamtek - Hibernate for NoSQL, or whatever you have in mind
    Status: accepted into the program
    Report on how to map Java objects to persistent storages. In high-load projects, you have to count every extra byte of meta-information, and reflection can become an irrepressible waste of wasteful JVM. Morphia for Mongo, Hector and Easy-Cassandra for Cassandra, nameless jugglers with annotations for Hbase, Kundera for everything in a row - arguments will be given for using this or that tool in different cases.

    Ivan Shabalin, Colvir Software Solutions - Approach to the development of a service bus for an enterprise in the banking sector
    Status: in doubt
    The report will describe the method of developing web services based on OSGi technology using the Apache CXF, Apache Camel, Aries Blueprint libraries. Separately, development features will be noted that facilitate the updating of the version of the service at the client.

    Ivan Shabalin, Colvir Software Solutions - Technology for generating metamodel web service interface specification
    Status: in doubt
    Report on the developed plugin for Maven, which takes as a basis a web service metamodel and generates a unique WSDL service from it, according to a set of XML schemes and data from a database. A metamodel is a groovy script that initializes a bin hierarchy that describes the service namespaces, its operations (grouped by category), links to service description elements from the database. WSDL is generated according to the document-literal wrapped pattern.

    Igor Sukhorukov, Deutsche Bank - AspectJ Scripting
    Status: in doubtAspectJ Scripting allows you to collect metrics and trace the interaction in a cluster in an application, which consists of many distributed processes / components that interact with each other. The framework under consideration is closest in functionality to byteman and btrace, but it uses a modified AspectJ agent and its language to describe pointcut expressions.

    Andrey Solntsev, Codeborne - In Java, you can also make a good API
    Status: questionable
    Report on how to properly design an open API. Some checklist will be given: whether all methods are convenient, understandable, whether all classes are extensible, whether any behavior can be configured and redefined.

    Roman Grebennikov, Sociohub - Scala under the hood
    Status: in doubt
    If you are doing not a simple CRUD application on Scala, but something that is at least remotely related to the load, you need to understand well what exactly all of these monad shmonads cost you. The report will tell you about the magic that the Scala compiler does under the hood, tells about the horrors of scala collections, recursion and pattern matching. And about why this is happening.

    Nikolay Ryzhikov, WaveAccess / HealthSamurai - Why clojure should become your next JVM language
    Status: questionable
    Clojure is a modern and essentially functional LISP dialect that can be run on JVM, CLR & JSVM, and designed specifically for concurrency. During the talk we will get acquainted with the clojure language, some libraries and in parallel we will create a full interactive web application from scratch.

    Vladimir Sitnikov, NetCracker - We regularly express ourselves
    Status: admitted to the program
    The report will tell you what to do if your regular expression lasts 30 seconds on a line of 50 thousand characters and how to prevent StackOverflowError from RegExp at the code review stage . Approaches to bypassing bottlenecks in the standard java.util.regex library will be shown, alternative implementations will be considered, and criteria for distinguishing a bad regular expression from a good one will be given.

    Andrey Kogun, CROC - Do we need a framework !? Development using Spring Boot
    Status: in doubt
    The speaker will share his opinion on how a modern framework should look and the need to use frameworks in general. The main focus will be on Pivotal's new convention over configuration framework - Spring Boot. The main application cases, experience gained during the year of application in development, advantages and disadvantages in comparison with the main competitors will be considered.

    Oleg Anastasiev, Classmates - Beyond the Edge of NoSQL: NewSQL on Cassandra
    Status: in doubt
    Report on the development of our own data warehouse of the NewSQL class: a DBMS that provides fault tolerance, scalability and performance of NoSQL-systems, but at the same time preserves ACID guarantees familiar to classical systems. There are few working industrial systems in this new class (only Google Spanner immediately comes to mind), but there are none at all. The speaker and colleagues implemented such a system in Java and put it into commercial operation a year ago.

    Anton Keks, Codeborne - Architecture of Internet banking without Enterprise
    Status: accepted into the program
    A story about the architecture of Internet banking based on the Play Framework and Plain Simple Java. It will be shown why such a choice is better, faster, and cheaper than an architecture based on Enterprise solutions. The strengths and weaknesses of the Play Framework will be shown.

    Anton Arkhipov, ZeroTurnaround - Javassist in the service of a Java developer
    Status: accepted into the program
    Report on the Javassist library for working with bytecode in Java. The main objective of tools like Javassist is to analyze and dynamically create / modify Java class files. The speaker will show examples of using Javassist that are as close as possible to what he and his colleagues have to do in their JRebel and XRebel products to manipulate bytecode and integrate with application servers and all kinds of Java frameworks.

    Andrey Pangin, Odnoklassniki - The Best Debugger - DIY Made
    Status: Admitted to the Program
    The JDK includes rich tools for writing all kinds of debugging and monitoring tools: JVMTI, Dynamic Attach Mechanism, Serviceability Agent, Instrumentation API, etc. The report will show how to use them. It will tell you how jstack, jmap and jstat are internally structured. During the report, another similar utility will be written. The examples are based on practical cases, as well as the real problems of developers discussed at Stack Overflow.

    Sergey Kuksenko, Oracle - Iron counters on guard of productivity
    Status: accepted into the program
    Report on what exactly is “Hardware Performance Counters”, where to find them and how they can be used for performance analysis.

    Other speakers

    Of those who are not on this list, but who are going to come with a report - two foreign celebrities. Jacob Fain from New York will give one of three reports:
    • RESTful services and OAUTH protocol in IoT
    • Dart for Java Developers
    • JavaScript for Java Developers


    Evgeny Borisov will traditionally tell something about Spring and, possibly, about Groovy. In addition, we really hope that it will turn out to arrive at Baruch Sadogursky . At the moment he has a commonplace problem - with a high probability he will not have time to make a new passport for coming to us.

    Special guest

    Dmitry Galkin - Techno-bio-creatures: the code of artificial life
    Status: Keynote-report. The
    Report on contemporary art and its role in the development of technologies from early experiments with computers and robots to the hardcore of recent decades using nano- and neurotechnologies, bioinformation hybrids, new samples of techno-biological life and artificial artists was accepted into the program .

    Sammari

    Full announcements of reports accepted into the program can be found in the “Reports” section of the JPoint 2015 website.

    What else do you want to see in the JPoint 2015 program? Write in kamenty.

    At the end of the post - a traditional voting ballot. Which reports do you find most interesting?

    Only registered users can participate in the survey. Please come in.

    Which reports do you find most interesting?

    • 40.6% Roman Leventov, Higher Frequency Trading - Comparison of in-memory key-value stores 72
    • 32.2% Yakov Sirotkin, Sidenis - Migrating from PL / SQL to Java 57
    • 51.4% Alexey Shipilev, Oracle - Catechism java.lang.String 91
    • 49.7% Alexey Shipilev, Oracle - Compress me completely 88
    • 11.8% Nikolai Garbuzov, Donriver - How we packed bumps and learned how to get around the rake 21
    • 11.2% Arthur Pilipenko, Oracle - Closed Model in Java ME Embedded 20
    • 33.8% Gleb Smirnov, Plumbr - Secrets are in our heads, not in JVM 60
    • 37.8% Alexander Podkhaluzin, JetBrains - Development Productivity on Scala 67
    • 51.4% Nikita Salnikov-Tarnovsky - Where is my memory, man ?! 91
    • 39.5% Dmitry Chuyko, Oracle - CompletableFuture is already here 70
    • 43.5% Nikolay Alimenkov, XP Injection - Do we need JMS in the world of modern Java technologies? 77
    • 42.9% Alexei Ragozin, Deutsche Bank - Continuous profiling of Java applications during operation 76
    • 13.5% Mikhail Shiryaev, Effective Management Systems - Object-Oriented Base 24
    • 14.1% Volker Simonis, SAP - Packed Objects, Object Layout & Value Types - a Survey 25
    • 22.5% Alexey Zinoviev, Tamtek - Hibernate for NoSQL, well, or whatever you have in mind 40
    • 20.3% Ivan Shabalin, Colvir Software Solutions - Approach to the development of an enterprise service bus in the banking sector 36
    • 10.7% Ivan Shabalin, Colvir Software Solutions - Technology for generating metamodel web service interface specification 19
    • 14.6% Igor Sukhorukov, Deutsche Bank - AspectJ Scripting 26
    • 38.4% Andrey Solntsev, Codeborne - You can also make a good API in Java 68
    • 36.7% Roman Grebennikov, Sociohub - Scala under the hood 65
    • 27.1% Nikolai Ryzhikov, WaveAccess / HealthSamurai - Why clojure should be your next JVM language 48
    • 29.3% Vladimir Sitnikov, NetCracker - We express ourselves regularly 52
    • 30.5% Andrey Kogun, CROC - Do we need a framework !? Development using Spring Boot 54
    • 19.7% Oleg Anastasev, Odnoklassniki - Beyond NoSQL: NewSQL on Cassandra 35
    • 40.1% Anton Keks, Codeborne - Internet Banking Architecture Without Enterprise 71
    • 32.2% Anton Arkhipov, ZeroTurnaround - Javassist in the service of a Java developer 57
    • 26.5% Andrey Pangin, Classmates - Best do-it-yourself debugger 47
    • 28.2% Sergey Kuksenko, Oracle - Iron meters are on guard of performance 50

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